paperseverywhere:

on her way to serve JUST1C3

paperseverywhere:

on her way to serve JUST1C3

hextrudedcubes:

hextrudedcubes:

hextrudedcubes:

OH MY GOD LOOK AT THIS

THIS IS FANTASTIC IM SO HYPED

IT’S EVERYTHING I EVER DREAMED

NOT ONLY IS THE PREMISE OF THE GAME THAT YOU ESSENTIALLY WRITE MODS FOR IT

IF YOU DON’T KNOW HOW, IT TEACHES YOU HOW

THE KICKSTARTER IS HERE

AND IF THEY REACH THEIR LAST STRETCH GOAL THEY’RE GONNA ADD CUSTOMIZABLE LIFE

IM SO GIDDY I CAN GIVE MYSELF GOOSEBUMPS BY THINKING ABOUT IT

Hey me

This is a thing

Oh, hey, thanks past me! I needed this.

In case anyone was wondering

I am still stupidly excited about this

the-walrus-squad:

[snipped for length]
I was hoping you’d check this one out! I’ll adjust my numbers accordingly. A few adjustments-
You’re quite right about the 2/3 average storage. My estimate for the whole storage was based on the size of a carbon atom, ignoring the hydrogen. So it’s not 3X too high, it’s 4/3 (1.33) of what it should be. You’re also right about gigibits, a stupid mistake on my part. So about 375/8= About 45 quintillion gigs. I also failed to account for the mechanisms that tag, organize, and read the data, so cut down to maybe 30Q, give or take. I’m not familiar with the terms in the tags, 1 bit / 21 AMU. If you mean atomic mass unit, shouldn’t it be 8AMU for H2C? And then as it’s 2/3 bits per link, that would be 12AMU per bit. I’m rusty on chemistry though so please correct me if I’m wrong. I went with the zigzag mechanic rather than reading single tagged hydrogen atoms because the tags are polarity based. Phospholipids are themselves birefringent, so the light reading the chains would be different between a zig carbon and a zag carbon. When a hydrogen atom is tagged, the polarity for a “1” link becomes opaque (as the hydrogen absorbs one photon to jump to a higher orbital) so the mechanism would be able to read when two links are the same, but not what each link is, as half the links would always be opaque. So basically it can only see half the chain, and only knows a 1 from a 0 when it encounters an opaque link on the transparent angle. That means it can either observe half the atoms for 1/2 efficiency, or it can rise to 2/3 by allowing half the bits to take two bits, and half to take up one. One cannot have a dual directional system as this would require contiguous hydrogen atoms to sometimes have high orbits, in which case they’d interfere with each other and break the chain, or explode. This last bit is fuzzy for me so if you know how to adjust for that problem, we could have a dual directional scanner and maintain 1/1 bit per carbon. But as is, I like the idea of depending on the polarity of the hydrogen and tagging which 1s are actually 0s.To be clear, this is based on a biochemistry class I took in 2002, and the drive idea was made during that class, so it’s 12 years old and I may be off in several ways. Advice welcome!
Finally, I like Fimbulvetr Trilogy (in your tag) as a name for the series, but minor spoiler- The actual Fimbul Winter is part of the story, and won’t manifest until Book 3. The Earth is quite sunny and hot until then.

It would probably be easier and certainly more reliable to just estimate the number of bits per kg. The atomic weigh of CH2 is about 14.027 g/mol (Carbon atoms weigh ~12 AMU because they have 6 neutrons), so if we divide Avagadro’s number by that and then multiply by 2/3*1/8*2/3, we get around 2.5*10^24 b/kg—and a kilogram is about the weight of a large wheel of cheese. That’s 2.5 quadrillion gigs, or about 1/10000th of our latest estimate; this is probably because the microbe cells in cheese are a lot smaller than humans’ cells.
I don’t really understand what you meant by “tagged”, unless you mean the part where light strikes the hydrogen to excite it. If you do, then I regret to inform you that an electron in this state returns to its relaxed one almost instantly.
And the polarity part, eesh. I’m kind of sorry about this, but birefringence is mostly a macroscopic phenomenon, and even if light at frequencies high enough to resolve individual atoms wouldn’t completely destroy the molecule, the zig-zag of the carbon chains has little to do with it. It’s rather the fact that the chains are strongly bonded along their length, but only weak hydrogen bonds hold them together perpendicularly.
…This might not be salvageable w/o technobabble/making up new discoveries or me being completely wrong. I don’t know :|
I actually got Fimbulvetr from that one post on page ~12 of your blog, which I remembered from before I read the book. The way you talked about it really stuck in my head.

the-walrus-squad:

[snipped for length]

I was hoping you’d check this one out! I’ll adjust my numbers accordingly. A few adjustments-

You’re quite right about the 2/3 average storage. My estimate for the whole storage was based on the size of a carbon atom, ignoring the hydrogen. So it’s not 3X too high, it’s 4/3 (1.33) of what it should be. You’re also right about gigibits, a stupid mistake on my part. So about 375/8= About 45 quintillion gigs. I also failed to account for the mechanisms that tag, organize, and read the data, so cut down to maybe 30Q, give or take.

I’m not familiar with the terms in the tags, 1 bit / 21 AMU. If you mean atomic mass unit, shouldn’t it be 8AMU for H2C? And then as it’s 2/3 bits per link, that would be 12AMU per bit. I’m rusty on chemistry though so please correct me if I’m wrong.

I went with the zigzag mechanic rather than reading single tagged hydrogen atoms because the tags are polarity based. Phospholipids are themselves birefringent, so the light reading the chains would be different between a zig carbon and a zag carbon. When a hydrogen atom is tagged, the polarity for a “1” link becomes opaque (as the hydrogen absorbs one photon to jump to a higher orbital) so the mechanism would be able to read when two links are the same, but not what each link is, as half the links would always be opaque. So basically it can only see half the chain, and only knows a 1 from a 0 when it encounters an opaque link on the transparent angle.

That means it can either observe half the atoms for 1/2 efficiency, or it can rise to 2/3 by allowing half the bits to take two bits, and half to take up one. One cannot have a dual directional system as this would require contiguous hydrogen atoms to sometimes have high orbits, in which case they’d interfere with each other and break the chain, or explode.

This last bit is fuzzy for me so if you know how to adjust for that problem, we could have a dual directional scanner and maintain 1/1 bit per carbon. But as is, I like the idea of depending on the polarity of the hydrogen and tagging which 1s are actually 0s.

To be clear, this is based on a biochemistry class I took in 2002, and the drive idea was made during that class, so it’s 12 years old and I may be off in several ways. Advice welcome!

Finally, I like Fimbulvetr Trilogy (in your tag) as a name for the series, but minor spoiler- The actual Fimbul Winter is part of the story, and won’t manifest until Book 3. The Earth is quite sunny and hot until then.

It would probably be easier and certainly more reliable to just estimate the number of bits per kg. The atomic weigh of CH2 is about 14.027 g/mol (Carbon atoms weigh ~12 AMU because they have 6 neutrons), so if we divide Avagadro’s number by that and then multiply by 2/3*1/8*2/3, we get around 2.5*10^24 b/kg—and a kilogram is about the weight of a large wheel of cheese. That’s 2.5 quadrillion gigs, or about 1/10000th of our latest estimate; this is probably because the microbe cells in cheese are a lot smaller than humans’ cells.

I don’t really understand what you meant by “tagged”, unless you mean the part where light strikes the hydrogen to excite it. If you do, then I regret to inform you that an electron in this state returns to its relaxed one almost instantly.

And the polarity part, eesh. I’m kind of sorry about this, but birefringence is mostly a macroscopic phenomenon, and even if light at frequencies high enough to resolve individual atoms wouldn’t completely destroy the molecule, the zig-zag of the carbon chains has little to do with it. It’s rather the fact that the chains are strongly bonded along their length, but only weak hydrogen bonds hold them together perpendicularly.

…This might not be salvageable w/o technobabble/making up new discoveries or me being completely wrong. I don’t know :|

I actually got Fimbulvetr from that one post on page ~12 of your blog, which I remembered from before I read the book. The way you talked about it really stuck in my head.

(Source: genderoftheday)

totalspiffage’s Red more like kill me now

paperseverywhere:

look at ‘im go /^o^ /

paperseverywhere:

look at ‘im go /^o^ /

(via striderswag)

spoiledchestnut:

s-opal:

rankstuck:

the last couple of days were really cold at my place, which made me think about harsh winters in Vitaspes and that one time when the kids had a snowball fight - John and Jade teamed up against Dave and Rose. this turned out to be quite unfair, since John and Jade’s powers allowed them to levitate the snowballs and throw them like bombs, while Dave and Rose’s powers were simply inapplicable

i’ve sketched some stuff for the rankstuck blog

Or in which Rose knows where all the snowballs come from and Dave is just a poor sod who gets pelted mercilessly. :P

On first read I read their looks as a sarcastic “hmm yes how very impressive they are.”. It’d be basically impossible to hit someone who can slow down time or predict the future, especially if they are martial arts experts. Maybe Rose would have trouble landing any hits, but still.

johnlockshipsdestiel:

officialprincewilliam:

officialprincewilliam:

can a dinosaur even get more fuckin rad?

image

you bet jurassican

i am so impressed by that dinosaur and that pun congratulations

(Source: officialprincewilliam, via nekohooch)

pungoeshere:

snailofapproval:

I meant to put this one up earlier…
witch of space commission~

look at this cutie

pungoeshere:

snailofapproval:

I meant to put this one up earlier…

witch of space commission~

look at this cutie

(via her-imperious-waterbitch)

salihombox:

a lost message about aquariumstuck meenah teach aranea how to walk
image

(via pseudorealm)

howdoicompute said: Important question: will book two or three break my heart and leave me unable to ever love again?

the-walrus-squad:

Assuming you mean heartbreaking in romantic terms-

Though Book 1 was pretty much devoid of romance, Books 2 and 3 have more and more. Thing is, these are Valkyries. Their affairs don’t look like a Nicholas Sparks novel, or even a John Green novel. They’re brutal, vicious people and when they fall for each other it’s not always pretty. In fact it pretty much never is.

Book 2 has a romance, but it might get ugly. It might be perverse. People might get hurt and Valkyries really know how to hurt people. So expect the romance here to be comparable to typical romantic literature as Valhalla was to typical action literature. Darker, more bizarre, and intensely devoid of sentimentality or sappiness. The reaction thus far has been “Well geez.”

Book 3 has, in my opinion, a more positive relationship at its core and though the book itself is a bit darker than 2, the ending of the whole series is in my opinion a happy one. Others have said it’s more like bittersweet, but in a way I made the entire series very dark and unsentimental in order to justify one well placed important positive moment at the very end. So there will be a ray of light in all that darkness. I think it’s a very bright one.

If you meant in general, the series has some sad parts but I think you’ll find it worth it for the happy ones. If they break your heart, you’ll thank them for doing it so your heart could be rebuilt stronger. Valkyries are the strongest people in the world. They fight incredibly heard to get what they want, through injury and past death and impossible odds they win what they’re after. So whoever is left at the end of the book will have a happy ending.

Even if they have to kill everyone else horribly to get it.

"whoever is left at the end of the book" betTER INCLUDE VIOLET AND VIBEKE